Up

"Honest" news. The Luhansk journal 12/27/2016 13:45:00. Total views 876. Views today — 1.

A whole range of emotions, the main of which is bewilderment, always goes with the watching of the local news. Probably, most of the officially broadcasted information should bring positive and fill with optimism and pride for the country you live in, as in the classic tradition of the USSR news.

Perhaps this is correct, and it should be this way according to some canons of the media and mass management principles of psychology. But when we watch the local news, the feeling is always full of duality that broadcasted via media life takes place somewhere in a different dimension and does not intersects our real life in any way.

Optimism, joy, life contentment – all that is generously served us via the media. Of course, total negative will not be shown, and criticism will be served in order to strengthen the taste of the main dish.

But the same number of positive things happens around us, and it is hidden from us behind our everyday cares. Sometimes I think that I live in the wrong part of the city, and everything that happens does not intersect me.

Sometimes I catch myself thinking that perhaps I do not go to the center of the city and do not attend these optimistic events, and maybe I just do not know when all this happiness begins…

In general, we are all at sea when watching the news. Obviously this is the skill of the journalist – to show what is happening in such a way that he or she would never see and perceive it.

Ridiculously low prices that are impossible to find anywhere were mentioned in the material about the sail of Christmas trees that came in the market of Luhansk before the New Year. And this is puzzled too – where are they sold at such low prices that I cannot come across a treasure trove. This is very similar to the conversation with friends in the summer of 2014:

- So, how are you?

- There is no water, light, they fire. Horribly and badly!

- No one has water and light now, and the fire is all around, that is, you are like everyone and everything is okay!

Someone watches the local news and smiles in acknowledgment to his own thoughts, and someone wonders that optimism of the heroes of the videos.

I used to watch the regular TV news together with the inhabitants of the nursing home. This is where it was a breath of air behind the TV glass. Unable to go out and see it with their own eyes, people watched everything as a very fascinating series about someone's (and a little bit about their own) life.

Someone believed everything, someone resented, but communication with the TV was if not bilateral, then at least quite active. Most of our news is watched in silence or with sarcastic remarks, as we see how it actually happens from the inside.

Maybe our local news are shot for Ukraine to convince everyone beyond the line of distinction that everything is fine here, life is in full swing and everything is getting better? But many people do not want to flash in the news and do not tend to be caught on camera, being in the operator's field of vision. "You never know how things will develop, it is better to stay in the shadow".

From this also comes unwillingness to work in "military" structures and "ministries". Such a job closes the possibility of escape to Ukraine. You must understand very clearly what you will lose, and what you will get and whether such losses are comparable with the acquisitions.

I heard a story about a young lady who, after working in the civil positions in the local "military" object, went to a vacation to visit her relatives in Ukraine. She departed, passed checkpoints in Stanitsa Luhanskaya, but somewhere in Severodonetsk she was removed from the bus. Maybe it's just a rumor, but there are a lot of such rumors around.

There are a lot of those who do not want to flash on the local news, even in harmless segments. It could be the hope that things and authorities could change, or simply reluctance to shine on the TV...

Yesterday my friend sent me a text: "I heard your yet another minister was thrown into prison? What a mess you have at the top!" And even if the rumors are provocation, for some reason you believe it, because such news and sensations occur way too often. Starting as a newspaper hoax, they appear to be very real at the absurdity of what is happening.

The changes from good to bad happen so often that this could be a plot of any spy movie... Though in movies it is somehow noble, bright and adamantly, but here things are dirty, false and factitious. And no one will ever know whether the dead ones were heroes or traitors, whether they really were wolves in sheep's clothing, or became victims of circumstances...

Nowadays, when meeting with former colleagues of the pre-war life and work, we often discuss where our friends and colleagues are now working.

You could even put flags on a map: Moscow, Sochi, Crimea... Kiev, Luhansk again, Rostov ... Who got what position, how much earns, is everyone satisfied with their lives?

And as a conclusion: after the requirements of our workplace, for many of them another job would be a piece of cake. But are the former colleagues interested in their new jobs and new life?

Although we don’t talk about these issues. What is the point to ask each other these sacramental questions? Too often we all just quickly and strongly insist that our new life is good, the salary is decent and no one plans to come back. But when saying goodbye, we casually ask each other: "Do you remember..?". And then there are two unanimous sighs for the lost plans, friends, stability, salary, corporate parties and beloved work.

We never talk about why things are like this and how everything could have been. We never talk about our views or preferences, because one thing is clear for sure – regardless of our views and attitudes to what is happening, we can not change and affect anything.

The choice is only to leave or stay, to complain or accept, take what is happening here with optimism and faith in a better future or be bewildered by the fact that real life is rarely like the one we see on television.

Olga Kucher, Luhansk, for OstroV